Mammals

Dolphin

Dolphin

There are 32 species in this, the largest, most diverse cetacean family, which is found in all oceans and some tropical rivers. Most have beaked snouts and slender streamlined bodies and they are among the smallest whales.

Donkey

Donkey

The ass is the wild relative of the donkey. Donkeys were probably one of the first beasts of burden. Over the last few thousands years they have spread to all continents, though the natural range of wild asses is from Oman to Morocco.

Dromedary

Dromedary

These tough animals have been domesticated in and around the Arabian peninsula for more than 4,000 years, and are prized for their endurance in hot, dry conditions. The Dromedary, or onehumped, camel can carry loads of more than 200 kg (440 lb) for several days.

Dugong

Dugong

There is now only 1 species in this family, the other member, Steller’s sea cow, having been exterminated in the 18th century by excessive hunting, only 25 years after its discovery. The way that dugongs rest, with their heads above the waves.

Duiker

Duiker

The subfamily Cephalophinae contains two groups: the forest duikers, of which the bay duiker is one, and the bush duikers. The bay duiker is typical of its group, with rather slender legs, a slightly hunched back and a smooth, glossy coat.

Eastern Cottontail

Eastern Cottontail

Eastern cottontail rabbits do not dig burrows, although they may shelter in disused ones dug by other animals. Generally they shelter in thickets or forms - shallow depressions made in tall grass or scraped in the ground. Eastern cottontails forage at night.

Eastern Mole

Eastern Mole

The eastern mole ranges from Wyoming and S. Dakota in the north and west to Texas and Florida in the south. There is also a smaller, isolated population in Mexico. This mole needs to dig its burrows in soil that is relatively free of large roots and rocks.

Eland

Eland

The description of 'giant' for this eland refers to its horns, rather than its overall body size when compared with its relative, the common eland. This is one of two species of eland, both of which occupy similar types of open savannah habitat.

Elephant

Elephant

The two species of elephant are by far the largest terrestrial mammals; they may stand up to 13 ft (4 m) at the shoulder and weigh as much as 13,000 lb (5,900 kg). One species lives in Africa, the other in India and Southeast Asia.

Elephant Seal

Elephant Seal

Elephant seals live in the waters around Antarctica and come ashore on the region’s islands. They are seen as far north as South Georgia in the South Atlantic. Elephant seals feed on fish and squid. Killer whales represent the only major threat to adults.