Mammals

Crabeater Seal

Crabeater Seal

Crabeater seals are found mainly on the pack ice and barren islands that surround the continental landmass of Antarctica. They are also occasionally found farther north on ocean islands and on the coasts of southern Africa, South America and Australia.

Deer

Deer

Deer are a group of hoofed mammals that are found across the Northern Hemisphere. They belong to the Cervidae family of mammals. In form and habit, deer resemble the horned antelopes of Africa, which are actually more closely related to sheep and cattle.

Dhole

Dhole

At the end of the last Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago, dholes ranged right across the northern hemisphere, but now their distribution is much smaller. A highly social animal, it is often seen in packs of around ten animals, sometimes as many as 25.

Dik-Dik

Dik-Dik

The unusual name of these small, shy antelopes stems from the dik-dik sound of their alarm call, uttered when disturbed out in the open. Kirk’s dik-dik is a dwarf antelope. It lives in dry brushlands, where there are thick bushes to provide food.

Dolphin

Dolphin

There are 32 species in this, the largest, most diverse cetacean family, which is found in all oceans and some tropical rivers. Most have beaked snouts and slender streamlined bodies and they are among the smallest whales.

Donkey

Donkey

The ass is the wild relative of the donkey. Donkeys were probably one of the first beasts of burden. Over the last few thousands years they have spread to all continents, though the natural range of wild asses is from Oman to Morocco.

Dromedary

Dromedary

These tough animals have been domesticated in and around the Arabian peninsula for more than 4,000 years, and are prized for their endurance in hot, dry conditions. The Dromedary, or onehumped, camel can carry loads of more than 200 kg (440 lb) for several days.

Dugong

Dugong

There is now only 1 species in this family, the other member, Steller’s sea cow, having been exterminated in the 18th century by excessive hunting, only 25 years after its discovery. The way that dugongs rest, with their heads above the waves.

Duiker

Duiker

The subfamily Cephalophinae contains two groups: the forest duikers, of which the bay duiker is one, and the bush duikers. The bay duiker is typical of its group, with rather slender legs, a slightly hunched back and a smooth, glossy coat.

Eastern Cottontail

Eastern Cottontail

Eastern cottontail rabbits do not dig burrows, although they may shelter in disused ones dug by other animals. Generally they shelter in thickets or forms - shallow depressions made in tall grass or scraped in the ground. Eastern cottontails forage at night.