Mammals

Common Dolphin

Common Dolphin

The classification of these dolphins has been controversial, and the long-beaked form is now regarded as a separate species, known scientifically as D. capensis. The common dolphin is also called the short-beaked saddleback dolphin.

Common Marmoset

Common Marmoset

Common marmosets live on the edges of tropical forests in north-eastern Brazil. The species is also known as the white-tufted-ear marmoset. However, the destruction of their forest habitat means that they are less common than they once were.

Cotton-top Tamarin

Cotton-top Tamarin

These tamarins have a very limited range, and three-quarters of their forest habitat has now been destroyed. Their population consists of around 2000 individuals. Cotton-top tamarins have an unusual breeding system. They live in groups of up to 20 adults.

Cottontail Rabbit

Cottontail Rabbit

The desert cottontail is distinguished from the brush rabbit, with which it overlaps in the south of its range, by its larger size and ears and by its grayish coat. Despite their name, desert cottontail rabbits do not just live in desert habitats.

Cougar

Cougar

Cats belong to the Felidae family of mammals. They fall into two main groups. The Panthera genus contains the big cats, such as lions and tigers, while Felis comprises the small cats, including the domestic cat. Cougars are also known as pumas.

Coyote

Coyote

Coyotes live throughout North America, from the humid forests of Panama to the treeless tundra regions of Canada and Alaska. They are most common in the unpopulated desert areas of the south-western United States and northern Mexico.

Crabeater Seal

Crabeater Seal

Crabeater seals are found mainly on the pack ice and barren islands that surround the continental landmass of Antarctica. They are also occasionally found farther north on ocean islands and on the coasts of southern Africa, South America and Australia.

Deer

Deer

Deer are a group of hoofed mammals that are found across the Northern Hemisphere. They belong to the Cervidae family of mammals. In form and habit, deer resemble the horned antelopes of Africa, which are actually more closely related to sheep and cattle.

Dhole

Dhole

At the end of the last Ice Age, about 15,000 years ago, dholes ranged right across the northern hemisphere, but now their distribution is much smaller. A highly social animal, it is often seen in packs of around ten animals, sometimes as many as 25.

Dik-Dik

Dik-Dik

The unusual name of these small, shy antelopes stems from the dik-dik sound of their alarm call, uttered when disturbed out in the open. Kirk’s dik-dik is a dwarf antelope. It lives in dry brushlands, where there are thick bushes to provide food.