Mammals

Hippo

Hippo

There are 2 species of hippopotamus both found only in Africa, although fossil evidence shows that the family was once more widely distributed in the southern parts of the Old World. Hippopotamuses eat only plant food, which does not contain a large amount of nutrients.

Hooded Seal

Hooded Seal

The pouch on the heads of mature male hooded seals explains their name. It can be expanded to about twice the size of a football. Hooded seals rarely approach land, preferring to spend their whole lives among the ice floes in the cold Arctic Ocean.

Horse

Horse

Although there is only one surviving species of wild horse, DNA tests suggest four wild bloodlines contributed to the ancestry of the domestic horse, and there are now around 300 breeds. These have been developed both for their speed.

Howler Monkey

Howler Monkey

The loud calls made by these monkeys indicate their presence and deter neighbouring troops from invading their feeding territory, thereby avoiding conflict. Brown howler monkeys have a very unusual way of digesting their food.

Humpback Whale

Humpback Whale

These whales are relatively conspicuous because they often come quite close to shore, swim at the surface and jump above the waves. Humpback whales spend their summers feeding far from shore, in the cold waters near the poles.

Hyrax

Hyrax

Small herbivores found in Africa and the Middle East, the hyraxes, conies or dassies generally look like rabbits with short, rounded ears. There are about 6 species, and the family is the only one in its order. Some hyraxes are agile climbers in trees.

Impala

Impala

Antelopes are a large group of hoofed animals that live mainly in Africa, with a few living in Asia. Antelopes belong to the same group of mammals as cattle, bison, sheep and goats. Gazelles also belong to this same group.

Indri

Indri

The description "indri" simply means "there it is", a term that was mistakenly believed to be the native name for this particular lemur! The indri is easily identified by its stumpy tail. It has a longer muzzle than the sifakas and a naked black face.

Jackal

Jackal

The jackals are found mainly in open grassland terrain. They are opportunistic feeders, eating whatever carrion and small mammals they can find, as well as a lot of plant matter. However, golden jackals hunt more than other species.

Jackrabbit

Jackrabbit

This desert-dwelling species is a true hare. It is able to twist and turn at speed, and can even swim away from danger. These hares therefore tend to rest during the day, becoming active towards dusk. Although they are solitary by nature.